International study identifies strategies for improving smoking cessation support for cancer patients

An international study identified key areas to improve evidence-based smoking cessation support for cancer patients, highlighting improved clinician education and the development of dedicated resources as ideal targets for elevated support.

In its study, the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer surveyed 1,153 members about current tobacco assessment and cessation practices for cancer patients. Its members, all physician-level oncology providers, indicated a number of factors generally associated with asking about tobacco use and advising patients to quit:

  • Work setting
  • Time since completing a terminal degree
  • Percent of time devoted to clinical care
  • History of tobacco use

The physicians noted a lack of clinician education or experience and lack of available resources for referral as the dominant barriers to providing support. The authors concluded that improved clinician education and the development of dedicated resources are key areas to improve cessation support for cancer patients.

Have you worked in smoking cessation for cancer patients? Share your thoughts by tweeting @globalbridges or posting to the Global Bridges Discussion Board.