Tobacco dependence treatment training: an interview with Silvia García Maldonado and Oscar Vazquez

Global Bridges-Latin America (GBLA) partnered with the InterAmerican Heart Foundation to pilot a new training format for healthcare professionals in tobacco dependence treatment.

The National Institute for Respiratory Diseases (INER) in Mexico City hosted the training in the fall of 2014 as part of an ongoing agreement with GBLA to train primary care physicians, nurses, and other Mexican healthcare professionals on tobacco dependence treatment. INER is Mexico’s acknowledged leader in treatment of tobacco dependence and COPD, and developed the first Spanish-language online course in tobacco dependence treatment in 2011.

Eleven instructor trainees selected by their organizations participated in a dynamic session on adult learning principles and training techniques, and the next day they joined expert faculty in delivering training modules for their colleagues.

The Day 1 curriculum was developed by adult learning expert Esteban Cruz of the Mexican Institute for Public Health (INSP), based on the World Health Organization’s Training Package for tobacco dependence treatment. For Day 2, the basic Global Bridges curriculum was re-organized to align with the WHO framework.

26Feb2015-blog34-photo1

Silvia García Maldonado and Oscar Vazquez were among the participants and shared some thoughts about the training:

Silvia García Maldonado, Member of Tobacco Control National Office, Mexico

 

Briefly describe your work in tobacco control:

My responsibility is to strengthen, implement and disseminate health policies related to tobacco use.

What is the most motivating part of your job?

The opportunity to raise awareness among the general public and decision makers about this major health topic and promoting actions against tobacco.

What is the most frustrating barrier you face?

Modest recognition of this issue among the general population and the tobacco industry’s efforts to maintain the status quo.

How will the Global Bridges training help you do your job?

The training for instructors was particularly useful based on the efficient and effective way in which the information was handled.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the Global Bridges network?

I would propose to run more events like the one we just had the opportunity to attend.

Oscar Vazquez Engineer, member of CAEDRO AC

Briefly describe your work in tobacco control:

I work in an area of the National Anti-Addiction Commission (CONADIC) in Mexico that is in charge of linking energies with other government offices, Mexican States, nongovernmental organizations, public citizen groups, etc. Although the National Office on Tobacco Control is not in our area, we must support their work.

What is the most motivating part of your work?

To be able to support efforts to address the serious consequences of tobacco-related problems.

What is the most frustrating barrier you face?

From my past experience working with the Mexico City Ministry of Health, I can point out the barriers to accelerate procedures in order to answer appropriately to challenges. In Latin America we call this the “bureaucratization” of government offices.

How will the Global Bridges training help you do your job?

CONADIC is beginning to develop human resources based on competencies (although this is not my focus but I have a personal interest) and in my perspective the training allowed me to appeal a minimal contents standard that could not only be applied to a country like Mexico, but to the entire Latin American region as well.

Is there anything else you’d like to share with the network?

Just to reiterate my thanks for sharing your project and to make clear that I would like to stay in contact with this initiative.